Passau, Germany

Passau sits on the bank of the Danube where its two tributaries, the Inn River from the south and the Ilz River from the north flow into the Danube.

The confluence of the River Inn, Ilz, and the Danube

This confluence of the rivers often causes flooding of the city from time to time and the worst was in 1501 as shown on the building wall.

Along the river bank is where the old part of the town sits. It used to be the busy merchant’s market exchange center, now it is mostly occupied by artisans.  Passau was an old Roman colony until it was granted by the Holy Roman Empire to the Prince-Bishop of Passau along with a territory that included the present-day Vienna up to Hungary with its capital in Passau.  The St. Stephen’s Cathedral here was the original mother church of the St Stephen’s Church in Vienna.  The original cathedral was destroyed by fire in the 17th century.  What we see today is the rebuilt of St. Stephen’s Cathedral of the Baroque style.

Inside St Stephens’s Cathedral decorated by Giovanni Battista Carlone and frescos by Carpoforo Tencalla
The largest cathedral organ in the world with 17,774 pipes and 233 registers, all of which can be played with the five-manual general console in the gallery
Veste Oberhaus from the river
The view of the confluence of the river Danube, Inn River, and Ilz River from the Oberhause fortress

Veste Oberhause is the Oberhause fortress built 1219 by the Bishop of Passau.
It sits facing the Danube between the Ils and Inn River which puts it in a good position to monitor the goods passing by, therefore it served as a stronghold for the Prince-Bishop to collect tax for his principality.  Today it houses a museum, youth hostel, restaurant.  The ground had been used for open theater.

The Townhouse of Passau
look at the colorful buildings of Passau. It is said the color represents the goods they sell. Such as the pink is for meat products, yellow is for beers and green is for produce.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s