Regensburg, Germany

Regensburg is a Bavarian city on the Danube of Southeast Germany.  There were settlements here during the Stone Ages.  Around 90 AD the Romans built a fort here.  Not until the  Stone Bridge was build during 1146, Regensburg began to flourish.  The bridge connects the trade from northern Europe to Venice, and because of this Regensburg became the cultural center for southern Germany noted for its gold works and fabric.

20171109_141732
Steinerne Brucke (Stone Bridge) built between 1135 and 1146

Today, the Stone Bridge still stands with some restorations which will be completed soon.

Regensburg is the best preserved medieval city in Germany.  Its Old Town Center was listed by UNESCO as World Heritage Site.  With its oldest pedestrian street, built by Romans, in Germany, it is easy to get around.  Here are some of the views of this Old Town which is still active and viable.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The Town Hall Square consists of the Old Town Tower of the 13th century and the baroque style Old Town Hall and the Gothic Imperial Chambers building where the Perpetual Imperial Assembly met from 1663 to 1806. This is where the expressions “to put something on the long bench” (to postpone something) and “to sit at the green table” (to take important decisions) come from.

Goliathhaus Regensburg (‘Goliath House’ ) built around 1260 and the painting of David’s fight with Goliath was done around 1573 is both listed by UNESCO as one of the landmarks of the World Heritage City of Regensburg.
Cathedral of Regensburg dedicated to St. Peter’s is an example of the Gothic architecture in Bavaria. Its construction started in the early 11th century and approximately 600 years later it finally finished in 1872. This cathedral is the Bishop’s church and home of the Regensburger Domspatzen (“cathedral sparrows”), It is also the burial-place of many important Bishops

The valuable stain glass windows of the Regensburg Cathedral installed between  1220-1230 and 1320-1370.

stain glass of Regensburg Cathedral
Alte Kapelle (Old Chapel) or Basilica of the Nativity of Our Lady is oldest catholic worship place in Bavaria. It is a fine example of the baroque style of the 18th century and one of the masterpieces of the rococo decoration
St. Emmeram Church was originally a Benedictine monastery in 739. It had a collection of books and manuscripts and in the 11th century serves as a library. Now the collection along with the treasures of the Abbey had been removed to Munich.

Last but not the least is the wonderful sausages from the restaurant specialized in different sausages.  It sells approximately 6,000 sausages daily.  Inside the restaurant only seats 35 people, but outside there are tables that can seat even more.  One would not want to pass this up.  Get a hotdog type sausage bun and eat it on the go is worth it too.

The Historic Sausage Kitchen of Regensburg, the oldest continuous open public restaurant in the world. The original building is the office of the construction workers for the Old Stone Bridge. When the bridge was finished it turned into a restaurant frequented by dockers, sailors, and cathedral workers. It became a grill sausage restaurant when the family took over in 1806.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s