Nanjing, China “Confucius Temple & Qin Huai Area”

Nanjing, China, the ancient city, Jinling, situated at the Yangtze River Delta, and has historically served, on and off, as the governing center of China since the 3rd century to 1949.  It has been an important center of arts, cultures, and educational,  with  these continuous influences made Nanjing the nation’s most civilized city thus winning the 2008 U.N. Habitat Scroll of Honor Award.

 

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The Temple of Confucius, the first philosopher, and educator of China, showing here, his statue with his eight disciples on each side.
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Inside Confucius Temple is where people come to pray for good luck on exams as most scholars since 1034.  The present temple was build in 1984, o n the original site, after it was burned down by the Japanese in 1937.

Not far from here is the Museum of Imperial Exam and Imperial Academy.  Nearby is the Qin Hai River where scholars used to gather in tea houses on its water banks.

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The longest screen in China facing the Confucius Temple.  Where one can hire a boat to float along the Qin Huai River taking in the sight of this ancient marketplace.
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Scenes of the Qin Huai River

Here are a glimpse of the things in the market place.

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With in this area is the old residence of the famous Chinese statesman, philosopher, and poet, naming the “Black  Clothes Lane” whether it was named because during the Three Kingdom Period,  it was the barracks of soldiers who wore black uniform or the nobles at the time prefer to show dignity in black clothes.  During the Tang Dynasty, a poet named Liu Yuxi wrote a poem:  (It goes something like this:

Wild flowers flourish along the Zhuque Bridge                         The sun sets at the end of Wuyi Lane                                           The swallows that had swarm the place                                      Had all flown to normal homes

Another often visited place of the locals when they seek the leisure of times gone by is a walk through Old Gate East. 

Thank you for your interest.

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